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Muscogee Creek Wisdom: Always Remember to Wash Your Neck

Muscogee Creek Wisdom: Always Remember to Wash Your Neck

I never set out to be an author. It’s an honor for me to have the opportunity to continue to help share Bear Heart’s messages for humanity. Over the years I’ve received so many notes from people who report how his words that reflect basic Creek values changed their lives. This story is but one of so many of my own, and it involves Bear Heart and Tony Hill, a most-respected spiritual leader and Muscogee Creek elder.

ONE TIME Bear Heart, myself and a group were to have dinner with Tony. We arrived at his modest home in Okmulgee, Oklahoma where he lived with his daughter and several grandchildren.

After a memorable dinner and while Bear Heart visited with everyone, I went outside to share some of my art supplies with Tony Hill’s grandchildren. I was having such a good time with the talented natural artists ranging from 4 to 15 years old.

My heart was so open and happy to bask in the energy field of these young, Indigenous natural artists. When their mother appeared to check on her children, I had an experience of what I describe as a “blissful spontaneous extra-ordinary generous moment.” I took off a very special necklace made of Minnesota pipestone and turquoise from my neck and put it on the children’s mother. She graciously accepted it without a word.

Back inside the home, she began showing everyone the newly gifted piece of jewelry. Everyone seemed to be in good spirits, so I was taken back at the tone the father used to speak in their Creek language with his grown daughter, the mother to whom I had gifted the necklace.

I whispered in Bear Heart’s ear, “Why is he angry at her?” Bear Heart whispered back, “He isn’t angry, he is reminding her that she “still has to wash her neck!” Later, I learned that a principle within their culture taught that when someone gives you something of value, of beauty, an acknowledgment, don’t get yourself feeling so “uppity.” You don’t start thinking that you did something so wonderful that you are now a very special person, higher than others.

The power of this lesson has stayed with me for many years now. Being brought up in a society that values material wealth as a measurement of self-esteem, I felt a deep sense of relief to experience a people who value each other separate from their possessions.

Every time someone thinks I, Reginah WaterSpirit, have done such a great thing to dedicate myself to supporting Bear Heart’s work, I hear Tony Hill admonishing his daughter. I still have to take care of the mundane things in my world. I still have to say “Thank You” to the force in nature that brings both challenges and blessings. I still have to wash my neck! I am one of all living beings on this Earth; not lower or higher than another.

Until next time, I am Reginah WaterSpirit, medicine helper to Muscogee Creek Caretaker of Certain Sacred Ways, Marcellus Bear Heart Williams.

 

 

 

‘The Bear is My Father’, a celebration of Muscogee Creek Nation Spiritual Leader Marcellus Bear Heart Williams to publish in January 2022

‘The Bear is My Father’, a celebration of Muscogee Creek Nation Spiritual Leader Marcellus Bear Heart Williams to publish in January 2022

SANTA FE, N.M. — The Bear is My Father, a book that celebrates the life, teachings and legacy of Marcellus Bear Heart Williams, a Multi-Tribe Spiritual Leader and author of the critically-acclaimed The Wind is My Mother, will be published by Synergetic Press on January 11, 2022.

Offering a mix of history and spiritual wisdom, The Bear Is My Father: Indigenous Wisdom of a Muscogee Creek Caretaker of Sacred Ways is considered a love story between Bear Heart and a community that stretches across the globe. The late Muscogee Creek Native American Church Road Man had a talent for seeing people as individuals, and for making them feel seen and special in their own ways. The Bear is My Father contains the final words Bear Heart wrote before his “going on” as well as contributions from friends and family whose lives were forever changed by Bear Heart’s presence and work. In this new book, Bear Heart uses stories of his youth and traditional medicine practices to convey lessons and knowledge about living in harmony and with respect for all.

“Living a spiritual life, no matter what the practice or religion, offers freedom, joy, happiness, and confidence that everything is within our freedom to enjoy it,” Bear Heart wrote.

The book is co-authored by Reginah WaterSpirit, Bear Heart’s Medicine Helper and wife of 23 years. 

“Even if you never had the privilege of meeting Bear Heart or hearing him speak, you will feel his warm presence when reading these stories and get a feel for the depth of the man,” Doug Alderson, author of Seminole Freedom and The Vision Keepers, Walking For Native Americans and the Earth, wrote of The Bear is My Father. “The pearls of wisdom found in these pages can be spiritual guideposts for a good and fruitful life. I urge you to take a few steps down the path of this book and discover how much we all have in common.”

Globally renowned, Bear Heart was one of the last traditionally trained medicine persons of the Muscogee Creek Nation. Weaving together the knowledge of many traditions, Bear Heart was an ordained American Baptist Minister, Road Chief, and renowned spiritual counselor. Speaking in 13 Native American tribal languages, Bear Heart was considered a Multi-Tribal Spiritual Leader and was called upon internationally for his healing work.

When Reginah would ask Bear Heart exactly how he made his medicine, he always answered, “I don’t make the medicine, it was here before me. I’ve been entrusted to be a caretaker of certain sacred ways.”

 

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